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Posts Tagged ‘National Sudoku Championship’

Here’s the story from the Philly Inquirer about Saturday’s chamionships. I also recommend checking out the accompanying video, which is nicely done.

Complete results are here.

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Just returned from Philadelphia, where I spent the day at the 2nd annual National Sudoku Championship. As far as I know, it was just a coincidence that it took place the weekend before the WPC, but it was serendipitous nonetheless, for both the U.S. team and myself: them, because they could consolidate two of their biggest puzzle competitions of the year into one trip (and two of the members, Thomas Snyder and Wei-Hwa Huang, could use Philly as a “stopover” on the way to Europe from California); me, because it gave me the opportunity to catch my first glimpse of the competitive puzzling community before flying out tomorrow. So what did I see?

An impressive display, by both the organizing committee and the players. Apparently over 1,000 people competed, which would mean a new Guinness World Record (breaking last year’s) for simultaneous sudoku participation. Yet the atmosphere was more library than sporting event: it could hardly have run smoother. Will Shortz hosted, fulfilling his emceeing duties with earnestness and a dash of flair (“Ready, Set, Solve!”), and the red and green t-shirted officials were on the ball throughout the day. Until the finals, it was a bit like watching a thousand people take the SAT, so I spent most of the early rounds wandering around the convention center, chatting up puzzle-book company representatives and family-business entrepreneurs trying to cash in on the sudoku craze (Joe Sudoku, perhaps?) with their own variations.

The playoffs, however, were worth the wait. The three finalists in each division (Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced) competed on giant white boards in front of the audience. Lucky for me, two of the finalists in the Advanced division were also members of the U.S. puzzle team: the aforementioned Snyder and Huang, both from the Bay Area. Huang is a four-time individual World Puzzle Champion; Snyder was the defending world and national sudoku titlist, and the first ever perfect-scorer in this year’s national qualifying test for the puzzle team. Heavy hitters both.

In the playoff, Snyder appeared to take an early lead (although, to be fair, what do I know about sudoku?…), filling in spaces while Huang made notes in and outside the matrix. Then, after three or four minutes, Snyder looked stumped. He got down on one knee, as if proposing marriage, and stared at the board without making a mark for what must have been two or three minutes. Meanwhile, Huang continued his slow but steady pace. Around the 7-minute mark, Snyder got up and began what looked like a furious comeback, but Huang picked up his pace as well — those last few squares go fast, even for novices — and ultimately it was too much ground to make up for Snyder. Huang finished at around 8:20, a minute or so ahead of Snyder, and took home a cool $10 grand for his toils. (I’ll ask him next week what he plans to do with the money.)

Oh, and I saw this too:

First time I’ve ever seen the blueprint of a men’s room laid out for me at the entrance. Probably unnecessary, but at least it was correct. I know because when I tested its accuracy by walking straight ahead, I bumped into the wall jutting out away from those sinks. Bloody nose and everything.

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